Posts Tagged ‘Spiritual

25
Nov
09

Kabbalah

Kabbalah is a discipline and school of thought concerned with the mystical aspect of Judaism. It is a set of esoteric teachings that is meant to explain the relationship between an infinite, eternal and essentially unknowable Creator with the finite and mortal universe of His creation. In solving this paradox, Kabbalah seeks to define the nature of the universe and the human being, the nature and purpose of existence, and various other ontological questions. Kabbalah originally developed entirely within the realm of Jewish thought and constantly uses classical Jewish sources to explain and demonstrate its esoteric teachings.

According to the traditional understanding, Kabbalah dates from Eden. It came down from a remote past as a revelation to elect Tzadikim (righteous people), and, for the most part, was preserved only by a privileged few. Talmudic Judaism records its view of the proper protocol for teaching this wisdom, as well as many of its concepts, in the Talmud, Tractate Hagigah, Ch.2.

The Sefirot are the ten emanations and attributes of God with which He continually substains the universe in existence. The Sephirot are considered revelations of the Creator’s will (ratzon), and they should not be understood as ten different “gods” but as ten different ways the one God reveals his will through the Emanations.

Altogether 11 sephirot are named. However Keter and Daat are unconscious and conscious dimensions of one principle, conserving 10 forces. The names of the Sephirot in descending order are:

  • Keter (supernal crown, representing above-conscious will)
  • Chochmah (intellect of wisdom)
  • Binah (intellect of understanding)
  • Daat (intellect of knowledge)
  • Chesed (sometimes referred to as Gedolah-greatness) (emotion of lovingkindness)
  • Gevurah (sometimes referred to as Din-justice or Pachad-fear) (emotion of severity/strength)
  • Tiferet (emotional balance of harmony/beauty-Representing compassion)
  • Netzach (emotion of victory/eternity)
  • Hod (emotion of glory/splendour)
  • Yesod (emotion of foundation)
  • Malkuth (emotion of kingship)
10
Aug
09

Classical elements

Many philosophies and worldviews have used a set of archetypal classical elements, most developed sets of the simplest essential parts and principles of which anything consists or upon which the constitution and fundamental powers of anything are based. There are several approaches (Ancient, Medieval, and Modern), the most frequently occurring theories of classical elements are held by the Ancient systems of thought. In use as an the explanation for patterns in nature, the word element refers to a substance that is either a chemical compound or a mixture of chemical compounds, rather than a chemical element of modern physical science.
The most frequently occurring theory of classical elements, held by the Hindu, Japanese, and Greek systems of thought, is that there are five elements, namely Earth, Water, Air, Fire, and a fifth element known variously as space, Idea, Void “quintessence” or Aether (the term “quintessence” derives from “quint” meaning “fifth”).
In Greek thought the philosopher Aristotle added aether as the quintessence, reasoning that whereas fire, earth, air, and water were earthly and corruptible, since no changes had been perceived in the heavenly regions, the stars cannot be made out of any of the four elements but must be made of a different, unchangeable, heavenly substance.
The pancha mahabhuta, or “five great elements”, of Hinduism are [Shristi] or bhumi (earth), ap or jala (water), agni or tejas (fire), marut or pavan (air or wind), or akasha (aether). Hindus believe that God used akasha to create the other four traditional elements; each element is then used to create the next, each less subtle than the last. It is also a religious and spiritual belief by most people that the human body is made up of these five essential elements and according to Hinduism, the human body dissolves into these five elements of nature, thereby balancing the cycle of nature, set in motion by the greater Lord God of this world.
Each of the five elements are inherently connected with one of the five senses, and acts as the gross medium for the experience of it; the basest element, earth, was created out of all more subtle elements, and is accessible to all the senses, including scent. The next higher element, water, has no smell (being more subtle than earth) but can be tasted. Next, fire cannot be tasted or smelled, but can be seen (and is associated with sight). Air can be heard or felt, and akasha, being space or ether, is the medium of sound but is inaccessible to all other senses.
In the Pali literature, the mahabhuta (“great elements”) or catudhatu (“four elements”) are earth, water, fire and air. In early Buddhism, the four elements are a basis for understanding suffering and for liberating oneself from suffering.
The Buddha’s teaching regarding the four elements is to be understood as the base of all observation of real sensations rather than as a philosophy. The four properties are cohesion (water), solidity or inertia (earth), expansion or vibration (air) and heat or calorific content (fire). He promulgated a categorization of mind and matter as composed of eight types of “kalapas” of which the four elements are primary and a secondary group of four are color, smell, taste, and nutriment which are derivative from the four primaries.

Many philosophies and worldviews have used a set of archetypal classical elements, most developed sets of the simplest essential parts and principles of which anything consists or upon which the constitution and fundamental powers of anything are based. There are several approaches (Ancient, Medieval, and Modern), the most frequently occurring theories of classical elements are held by the Ancient systems of thought. In use as an the explanation for patterns in nature, the word element refers to a substance that is either a chemical compound or a mixture of chemical compounds, rather than a chemical element of modern physical science.

The most frequently occurring theory of classical elements, held by the Hindu, Japanese, and Greek systems of thought, is that there are five elements, namely Earth, Water, Air, Fire, and a fifth element known variously as space, Idea, Void “quintessence” or Aether (the term “quintessence” derives from “quint” meaning “fifth”).

In Greek thought the philosopher Aristotle added aether as the quintessence, reasoning that whereas fire, earth, air, and water were earthly and corruptible, since no changes had been perceived in the heavenly regions, the stars cannot be made out of any of the four elements but must be made of a different, unchangeable, heavenly substance.

The pancha mahabhuta, or “five great elements”, of Hinduism are [Shristi] or bhumi (earth), ap or jala (water), agni or tejas (fire), marut or pavan (air or wind), or akasha (aether). Hindus believe that God used akasha to create the other four traditional elements; each element is then used to create the next, each less subtle than the last. It is also a religious and spiritual belief by most people that the human body is made up of these five essential elements and according to Hinduism, the human body dissolves into these five elements of nature, thereby balancing the cycle of nature, set in motion by the greater Lord God of this world.

Each of the five elements are inherently connected with one of the five senses, and acts as the gross medium for the experience of it; the basest element, earth, was created out of all more subtle elements, and is accessible to all the senses, including scent. The next higher element, water, has no smell (being more subtle than earth) but can be tasted. Next, fire cannot be tasted or smelled, but can be seen (and is associated with sight). Air can be heard or felt, and akasha, being space or ether, is the medium of sound but is inaccessible to all other senses.

In the Pali literature, the mahabhuta (“great elements”) or catudhatu (“four elements”) are earth, water, fire and air. In early Buddhism, the four elements are a basis for understanding suffering and for liberating oneself from suffering.

The Buddha’s teaching regarding the four elements is to be understood as the base of all observation of real sensations rather than as a philosophy. The four properties are cohesion (water), solidity or inertia (earth), expansion or vibration (air) and heat or calorific content (fire). He promulgated a categorization of mind and matter as composed of eight types of “kalapas” of which the four elements are primary and a secondary group of four are color, smell, taste, and nutriment which are derivative from the four primaries.

18
Jun
09

What is Nirvana?

Its one of my favorite hookas at Cafe Mocha surely. What do we mean by attaining Nirvana? Wanted to understand the meaning when I found this word in the book “Siddhartha” by Herman Hesse. does it mean salvation? Lemme figure it out.

Wiki says is the state of being free from both suffering and the cycle of rebirth. This is an important concept in Buddhism and Jainism.

Buddha described nirvana as the perfect peace of the state of mind that is free from craving, anger and other afflictive states (kilesa). The subject is at peace with the world, has compassion for all and gives up obsessions and fixations. This peace is achieved when the existing volitional formations are pacified, and the conditions for the production of new ones are eradicated. In Nibbana the root causes of craving and aversion have been extinguished such that one is no longer subject to human suffering (dukkha) or further states of rebirths in samsara.

The concept sounds nice. You dont feel the pain when you score bad marks or get dumped!!! So my next question is “how do you attain Nirvana?”… will figure it out in some other post.




So what’s this blog about?

Another attempt? Well yes. Attempting to figure out another sustainable model (there are some other attempts going on parallel-ly). Well, we have a lot of questions in mind. we read up stuff, we do some research to find answers to these questions. This is an attempt to publish that little 15-20 minute research.
August 2017
M T W T F S S
« May    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Click to subscribe to One Post Daily.

Join 5 other followers