18
Mar
10

malapropism


A malapropism (also called a Dogberryism or acyrologia) is the substitution of a word for a word with a similar sound, in which the resulting phrase makes no sense but often creates a comic effect.

The terms malapropism and the earlier variant malaprop come from Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s 1775 play The Rivals, and in particular the character Mrs. Malaprop. Sheridan presumably named his character Mrs. Malaprop, who frequently misspoke (to great comic effect), in joking reference to the word malapropos.

Some examples:

  • “…promise to forget this fellow – to illiterate him, I say, quite from your memory.”
       [obliterate]
  •   “O, he will dissolve my mystery!”
       [resolve]
     
  • “He is the very pine-apple of politeness!”
       [pinnacle]
     
  • “I have since laid Sir Anthony’s preposition before her;”
       [proposition]

 Read more here.

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Another attempt? Well yes. Attempting to figure out another sustainable model (there are some other attempts going on parallel-ly). Well, we have a lot of questions in mind. we read up stuff, we do some research to find answers to these questions. This is an attempt to publish that little 15-20 minute research.

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